Division of the Pepperrell Property

From Old Orchard Beach History
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Pepperrell Property contained the original tracts of land which became the town of Saco from whence Old Orchard was divided in 1883.[1]

In 1681, this patent was divided among a number of owners. [2][3]

Original Divisions

Plan of Saco, showing division of the the patent and historical localities. From Owen's Old Times in Saco, 1891.[2]
Plan of the division of Lewis and Bonython's Patent as drawn for Folsom's History of Saco and Biddeford[3], 1830.

Capt. Richard Bonython, the patentee, had two daughters who were married, in due season, to Richard Foxwell and Richard Cumming. Judith Lewis, daughter of Thomas Lewis, the other patentee, was the wife of James Gibbins. These men became, in time, together with John Bonython, the proprietors of most of the territory covered by the original grant. Cumming died about 1675 and his share fell into the hands of John Harmon, who was the husband of Cumming's only child and daughter, Elizabeth. Foxwell died in 1676, and his son, Philip, succeeded him in the ownership of a valuable plantation. Among James Gibbins, John Bonython, Philip Foxwell and John Harmon the property was divided. The actual survey and allotment of the land was made in 1681.

—Excerpt from Old Times in Saco, page 146.[2]

Gibbins' First Division

"We measured," reported the committee who had the division in charge, "the lower part, next Saco river, 142 poles north west from the foot line, unto a certain small water run, called Haley's Gut, being the ancient bound marked between Bonython, or his father, and the said Gibbins, and from said Haley's Gut, upon a north east by north line, unto the middle line of said patent, together with that triangular piece of land lying next Saco river and below the north east and south west line of the patent, which contains 400 acres of land next the sea; all which is to belong to said Gibbins for his first division. (Bare-Knee Point.)

—Excerpt from Old Times in Saco, page 146.[2]

Bonython's First Division

"From Haley's Gut., we measured 592 poles, north west, unto a little brook a little below Mr. Blackman's mill, and thence, north east by north, to the middle line aforesaid, which is two miles; and it belongs to John Bonython for his first division.

—Excerpt from Old Times in Saco, page 146.[2]

Foxwell and Harmon's First Division

"We measured two miles and 50 poles north west from Thomas Rogers' garden by the sea, in the middle line aforesaid, and from the end of that said two miles and fifty poles, two miles north east to the line of the patent next Blue-point, the aforesaid 50 poles above the two miles north west in lieu of the half of the aforesaid triangle of land next Saco river mouth; which is to belong to Philip Foxwell and John Harmon for their first division.

—Excerpt from Old Times in Saco, page 146-157.[2]

Much of this division would go on to become the town of Old Orchard in 1883.[1]

Gibbons' Second Division

"We measured from the north west end of the aforesaid two miles and 50 poles, two miles wanting 50 poles, north west in the aforesaid middle line, unto a maple tree, and from thence two miles north east to the outside line of the patent; to James Gibbins for his second division.

—Excerpt from Old Times in Saco, page 147.[2]

Gibbons' Third Division

"The next division is to run, from the aforesaid little brook below Mr. Blackman's mill in Saco river 3 and a half miles and 18 poles north west, and from thence two miles north east to the middle line of the patent; to belong to Gibbins for his third division.

—Excerpt from Old Times in Saco, page 147.[2]

Bonython's Second Division

"From the north west end of the aforesaid 3 and a half miles and 18 poles, J. Bonython is to run two miles 48 poles, next Saco river, to the north west end of the patent, and thence, two miles north east, along the head line of the patent, to the middle line; for his second division.

—Excerpt from Old Times in Saco, page 147.[2]

Foxwell and Harmon's Second Division

"The next division, on the north east side of said patent, is to begin at the north west end of the aforesaid four miles in length already measured, and to be two miles square-for Foxwell and Harmon's second division.

—Excerpt from Old Times in Saco, page 147.[2]

Gibbons' Fourth Division

"The last division of the north east side of the patent, is to begin at the north west end of the first two miles square, and to be also two miles square to the head of said patent; and to belong to Gibbons for his fourth division."

—Excerpt from Old Times in Saco, page 147.[2]

One half of the patent was thus set off to Gibbins as the heir of Lewis; and the other half to the heirs of Bonython, John Bonython having a double share.

—Excerpt from Old Times in Saco, page 147.[2]

Blackman and Walker Purchases

In 1680, Saco was blessed with the arrival of Benjamin Blackman, who first settled at Black-point (Prout's Neck) and afterwards (1683) removed to the settlement at the Falls. No sooner was Blackman comfortably housed than he began to invest in Saco lands and build up business interests. His first purchase included all the mill privileges on the eastern side of the river, as well as a piece of land containing 100 acres, upon which he built a saw-mill. His next enterprise was the encouragement of immigration on the part of Massachusetts colonists. Some men at Andover were favorably impressed with what they heard of the settlement at Saco Falls and entered into negotiations with Blackman, through an agent, respecting their removal. Blackman promised the agent, that if the men whom he represented would locate in Saco, he (Blackman) would provide a tract of land for their use, and to this end he had some transactions with Gibbins and John Bonython. Whether or not the Andover colonists came to Saco is uncertain, but in 1683 Blackman purchased the whole of Gibbins' second division, in the allotment above given, together with a portion of John Bonython's first division and the timber right on 4,000 acres lying northeast of the land already mentioned, i. e., on John Bonython's second division. Three years later, Blackman sold two-thirds of this large tract, one-third to Samuel Sheafe of Boston, and the other to Samuel Walker also of Boston. Sheafe soon sold out to Walker.

—Excerpt from Old Times in Saco, page 147-148.[2]

Division by Pepperell, Scamman and Weare

"Pepperell took a breadth of 80 rods, comprehending the part of the present village east of Main street, to the lower fence of the burying ground; Scamman 40 rods next below, and Weare 40 rods to the brook near Pipe Stave, now Gray's point."

—Excerpt from Folsom's History of Saco and Biddeford [3]

"First, Pepperell began at Nichol's brook, ran 44 rods; next Scamman 22 rods, and Weare 22 rods; which brought them to Gray's point, the lower side of the lot divided the year before. They now extended the north east bounds of that lot to the middle line of the patent; then beginning at its upper side, (on Main street) they set off, following the river, to Weare 40 rods, Scamman 40, Pepperell 80; (extending back two miles:) again, Pepperell 120, Scamman 60, Weare 60; Pepperell 120, Scamman 60, Weare 60 ; Pepperell 120, Seamman 60, Weare 60; Pepperell 127, Seamman 67 and a half, Weare 67 and a half, which completed the tract. A large rock in the river, above Little Falls, marks the extent of the division, as now understood.

—Excerpt from Folsom's History of Saco and Biddeford [3]

The privilege of cutting timber on the land northwest of the purchase, being, J. Bonython's second division, was also divided by the proprietors. Pepperell took the upper half of the tract, Weare the next quarter and Scamman the lower quarter."

—Excerpt from Folsom's History of Saco and Biddeford [3]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Town of Old Orchard, "The First Annual Report of the Municipal Officers and Supervisor of Schools of the Town of Old Orchard for the Year Ending February 1, 1884" (1884). Pages 4-7. http://digitalmaine.com/old_orchard_books/6
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 Owen, Daniel E., "Old Times in Saco" (1891). Books and Publications. 22. https://digicom.bpl.lib.me.us/books_pubs/22
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Folsom, George. History of Saco and Biddeford: With Notices of Other Early Settlements, and of the Proprietary Governments, in Maine, Including the Provinces of New Somersetshire and Lygonia. Saco: Printed by A.C. Putnam, 1830.