Biddeford and Saco Railroad

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An electric trolley car from the Biddeford and Saco Railroad waits at the end of the line in Old Orchard Beach.

The Biddeford and Saco Railroad was a transportation company that provided trolley service in the Saco, Biddeford and Old Orchard area.[1]

History

Horsecar Railroad

Interest in providing transportation to the area began on 2/24/1885 with the chartering of the Biddeford and Saco Horse Railroad by Biddeford natives Charles H. Prescott and Stephen F. Shaw. Fundraising was difficult and it was not until 2/19/1887 that the Biddeford and Saco Railroad company was formally organized. On 3/15/1887 plans were laid for an extension to Old Orchard from Saco.

Construction on the line began in 1888 and the first horse cars ran on July 4th of that year. The line was built for about $80000, half raised by 800 stocks sold at $50 each and the other half through a 20 year bond. Eight open and four closed cars were delivered from J. M. Jones' Sons of West Troy, New York. Each car was 16 feet long, with 8 rows of benches. Equipped with headlights and stoves, the cars could run at night and in the winter. Plows also ran on the line when snowfall was heavy. The line employed 60 horses to pull its rolling stock.

Each car started its journey at King's Corner in Biddeford and arrived at Old Orchard Street about an hour later. Trips ran from 8 AM to 9 PM. This route had two fare zones divided by the Old Orchard town line on Old Orchard Road. The cost per zone was 5 cents.

During the first summer of operation, the line serviced 125000 passengers, collecting $10000 in fares. Ridership was low in the winter, as the run between Saco and Old Orchard was suspended. This lead to a loss of $2200 in its first year, leaving a balance of only $53.29 to the company by 3/12/1889. The following season was also unprofitable, leading to a loss of almost $5000 by 6/30/1890. By 6/30/1891, the line had carried 226200 passengers for the year, grossing $16371 at an cost of $17328, leaving the line with a accrued deficit of $5952.97.[1]

Electric Trolleys

Electrification efforts began in 1890, though a deal with a New York company to use Daft branded equipment fell through that year. On 2/2/1891, the board of directors formally started the electrification process with a bond of $50000 for installing overhead lines and constructing a power station. The power station was built by Westinghouse, Church, Kerr and Company. Thomson-Houston Company of Lynn, Massachusetts provided generators and conversion of existing rolling stock. At this time, 10 bench cars were again ordered from J. M. Jones. Unconverted rolling stock would be towed behind the electric cars.

The first electric trolleys ran for Memorial Day on 5/30/1892. This reduced running time for the full journey from Biddeford to Old Orchard to half an hour. Subsequently, cars would now leave every 15 minutes instead of every 30 minutes. Motormen and conductors were instructed to assure passengers of the safety of the newly electrified lines, especially during thunderstorms. They also were expected to assist in upkeep of the line by reporting broken lines or insulators, and keeping a stock of fuses with them at all times.

The conversion resulted in a profit of $1663.10 in 1892 and $3015.51 in 1893, helping to reduce the deficit of the company. However, by 1896 profits fell and the company was almost $7000 in debt. Directors were unhappy, leading Charles H. Prescott and John F. Nourse to purchase absolute control of the company stock in 1897. When Nourse died the next year, Prescott gained control of his stock, only to become president of the company in 1900. As president, Prescott sold his stock to a number of directors of the Portland Railroad, eventually leading to talk in 1901 that the two systems would merge. This would not come to pass, although Prescott did become a director of the Portland Railroad.

The rails were upgraded as part of the electrification process, moving from 35 pound T rail as laid in 1888 to 90 pound 9 inch girder rails in the urban areas and 60 pound T rail elsewhere. The upgrade began in 1896 and was completed by 1900. The rolling stock was also gradually upgraded, moving to "J" controllers built by Walker Company of Cleveland, Ohio in all cars by 1892. Two more 10 bench cars were purchased in 1893 from Jones. Four 12 bench open cars and four 18 foot closed cars were purchased from J. G. Brill in 1900. The bodies of these cars were painted red and trimmed with yellow, with gold leaf applied for lettering. The roofs were painted light gray. An additional closed car as well as three secondhand (from Portland Railroad) 8 bench trailers were purchased in 1901. Four 20 foot closed cars and four 12 bench open cars were purchased from Brill in 1903. A line car was purchased in 1911 and a Traunton snowplow in 1914. All these upgrades brought the line up to the quality of the Portland Railroad.

Traffic was controlled from the car house in Saco on Beach Street. The dispatcher discerned the location of each car through a system of private telephones in place at each turnout. Operators would call from each turnout before leaving Old Orchard, Biddeford and Laurel Hill cemetery.[1]

Five Points Extension

An extension of the Biddeford line from King's Corner to Five Points was constructed along Alfred Street in 1900. It began operation 9/5/1900. At the same time, the wooden bridge between Biddeford and Saco was rebuilt in steel. Additional track was also laid down on Main Street in Biddeford. After this extension, more runs were added to the system using extra cars, often to support work at the mills.

After the Five Points extension was constructed, an additional fare zone was added, bringing the total up to three. Previously, in the summer, an additional zone was added between Laurel Hill cemetery and Halfway House. This change made the zone permanent, extending the zone from Laurel Hill cemetery to a point in Old Orchard 200 yards south of the intersection of Saco and Union Avenues. This point was known as the Pine Tree.[1]

Connections to Other Railroads

The Saco and Biddeford Railroad connected to the Portland Railroad via Main Street and Beach Street starting on 7/8/1902. The next year a connection to Old Orchard was built at the top of Old Orchard Street. The connection, which began service on 6/15/1903, ran through Dunstan Corner in Scarborough.

The Atlantic Shore Line Railway built a connection from Town House at Kennebunkport to Biddeford, which began operation on 8/8/1904. An extension to York Beach from Kennebunk on this line was built in 1907, effectively opening up a rail link to Boston. A single ferry at the state line in Portsmouth was the only transfer.[1]

Postwar Modernization

The system was rehabilitated and modernized after the first World War. By 1920, eight Birney safety car were purchased from the Wason Manufacturing Company. Open trailer cars were removed from service by 1925. Additional Birney cars were purchased in 1931, bringing the total up to 17 cars. Rails were updated in 1919, 1920, 1921 and 1924 in cooperation with the State Highway Department for restoration of the Route 1 highway. Tracks were relocated on Elm street in Biddeford for additional roadwork. The bridge on Old Orchard Road that crossed the Goosefare Brook was rebuilt in 1932, which also required track relocation.

Bullseye lights were placed over the front windows of Birney cars to denote the route the car was operating on. Cars on the Old Orchard route had green lights, while cars on the Saco route had red lights.[1]

Connecting Lines Close

The connection from Biddeford to Kennebunk was severed with the closing of the Atlantic Shore Railway, at the time run by York Utilities Company. A line to Proctor Road opened on track leased from the defunct company on 9/15/1927. It was promptly closed after the winter of 1929 due to low ridership and frequent derailments.

Connections to Old Orchard and Saco from the Portland Railroad were shuttered in April of 1932. An offer was extended to lease the lines, but regular use was never established due to experiences with the unprofitable Proctor Road line. The tracks were occasionally used for special events, like football games at Thorton Academy.[1]

Closure

Open car use began to decline in the 1930s. By 1939, only four open cars were in regular use; the rest of the service was provided by Birney safety cars.

It was decided that the line would be replaced by motor buses, or "motorized", in 1939. Five buses were ordered to begin operation on 7/6/1939.

The last day of operation for the trolley line was 7/5/1939. The last car over the line was driven by Eugene I. Hill, the son of the superintendent.[1]

Planned Extensions

The following extensions and lines were planned, but not built.

Camp Ellis Extension

During electrification planning, an extension off of Laurel Hill in Saco to the Camp Ellis stop of the Orchard Beach Railroad was planned. The goal was to eventually take over the Orchard Beach Railroad, running a circuit from its existing Old Orchard Street stop to the newly planned Camp Ellis extension. The entire line, including the existing railroad, would then be run off of electricity. However, the extension was never built and the Orchard Beach Railroad ceased operation on 9/5/1923.[1]

Saco River Electric Railroad

A line which would have connected to Biddeford and Saco to Bonny Eagle in Standish was chartered on 7/13/1897, but never built. The line would have covered 20 miles, starting from Water and Elm Streets in Saco. Its charter was approved on 11/23/1897, but subsequently dismissed when on 6/7/1899 when changes were requested. An extension to the charter was approved in 1901, but a second renewal was denied in 1904.[1]

Biddeford Pool Electric Railroad

A line was chartered to connect on 6/27/1902 Biddeford Pool to the system, but was also never built. The charter was renewed four times, the last on 10/2/1912.[1]

Biddeford, Kennebunk and Wells Electric Railroad

A line sought to be chartered in 1899 that would complete with the Atlantic Shore Line Railway to connect to points south of Biddeford. It was never built.[1]

North Street Extension

An extension was planned to connect Main Street in Saco to the Eastern Railroad by way of North Street. This extension was approved as of 9/16/1916, but never constructed.[1]

The Biddeford & Saco Railroad, Biddeford, Maine, will extend its tracks up North street to the Eastern Division of the Boston and Maine Railroad. It is reported that eventually a loop will be built to connect with the present line at the comer of Main and Elm streets.

Electric Railway Journal, September 16, 1916[2]

Route

Rail network as of September 1949.

According to Cummmings' The Biddeford and Saco Railroad, the original route was as follows:[1]

[It] began at King's Corner, at the junction of South and Elm streets in Biddeford, extended along Elm street and continued through Main street and across the bridge over the Saco river into Saco. In that city it ran through Main and Beach streets and along Old Orchard road to the Old Orchard town line, and thence through Saco avenue, Union avenue, Washington street, back on Saco avenue and down Old Orchard street to the Boston and Maine Railroad crossing at Old Orchard Beach, a distance of 5.728 miles.

There was a grade crossing of the B&MRR's Western division on Main street, Saco, and the horsecar line passed under steam railroad bridges on Beach street and on Old Orchard road, both in Saco.

—Cummmings, The Biddeford and Saco Railroad, page 4, 1956

Power

After electrification, the railroad had its own steam plant until 1911.

Mr. William Lee Church designed the steam plant of the power plant. Messrs. Westinghouse, Church, Kerr & Co. acted as engineers of the plant and had entire charge of the installation. The General Electric Co. furnished all the electrical apparatus. The building is of brick on granite foundations and measures 62 feet long by 36 feet 6 inches wide. The engine room is 37 feet by 34 feet 6 inches and contains two Westinghouse compound non-condensing engines, also two Thomson-Houston generators of 120 h.p. each, furnished by the General Electric Co. The boiler room is 22 feet by 34 feet 6 inches and contains two 100 h.p. Manning vertical boilers built by the Bigelow Co. of New Haven, Conn.

Street Railway Journal, December 1892.[3]

In 1900, a 266 cell storage battery was installed at the plant, along with another steam engine and generator. This equipment provided addition power to Portland Railroad for use on the Old Orchard portion of their network. By 1907, the plant has three engines, which allowed the plant to produce up to 430KW of power.

After 1911, power was purchased from York Light and Heat Company. Additional rotary converters were added to the steam plant to handle assist during the busy summer months. The steam plant was dismantled in 1916.

After motorization in 1939, the building was converted into a bus garage.[1]

Carhouse

The carhouse was located at 210 Beach Street in Saco, just before the Boston and Maine Railroad underpass and opposite from Promenade Avenue. It was also known as the Trolley Barn. Cars would be stored here in the evening. Maintenance was also provided at this location. A coal shed and small brick power station were also on site. A blacksmith shop was added in the spring of 1889. In the carhorse days of the line, 60 stalls would house the horses, watched over by the stable foreman. In the 1889 expansion, 34 additional stables were added. The building also housed the office of the superintendent and a waiting room for passengers.

The wooden building was demolished in 1939. The site later became used for private apartments.[1][4]

Staff

Many people were required to run the line.

In 1915, the following positions were required: 3 general officers, 24 conductors and motormen, 28 maintenance crew, 7 shop workers and a rotary station attendant.

The following people worked at the railroad.[1][4]

Name Role Started Ended Residence
Stephen F. Shaw President 1888 1890
Esreff H. Banks President 1890 Biddeford
Esreff H. Banks Chairman of Directors 1890 Biddeford
Charles H. Prescott Clerk 1888 1889 Biddeford
Charles H. Prescott Treasurer 1889 1900 Biddeford
Charles H. Prescott Director 1891 Biddeford
Charles H. Prescott President 1900 Biddeford
Charles A. Moody Treasurer 1888 1889
Eugene A. Worthing Superintendent 1888 1894
William A. Worthing Superintendent 1894 1910
Charles M. Durrell Superintendent 1910 1920
Eugene O. Hill Superintendent 1920 1941
John F. Nourse Auditor 1890 1898 Biddeford
John F. Nourse Director 1891 1898 Biddeford
Joseph Gooch Director 1891 Biddeford
George F. Calef Director 1891 Saco
Franklin Nourse Director 1891 Saco
S. S. Mitchell Director 1891 Saco
Charles B. Pratt Director 1891 Worcester, Massachusetts
Henry S. Seeley Director 1891 Worcester, Massachusetts
Edward A. Newman General Manager 1900 1909
William G. Davis Stockholder 1900 Portland
Charles F. Libby Stockholder 1900 Portland
William R. Wood Stockholder 1900 Portland
Ami Whitney Stockholder 1900 Portland
William A. Wheeler Stockholder 1900 Portland
J. S. Ricker Stockholder 1900 Portland
J. Burton Stride Clerk 1919
J. Burton Stride President 1931
Frank Perkins Motorman
Pat Hazelton Motorman
William Dunn Motorman
Eddie Leavitt Motorman
Ray Bellefeuille Motorman
Eugene I. Hill Motorman
Charles Leavitt Motorman
Charles Babb
George Bailey
Maurice Bellefeuille
Elmer Bryant
Lewellyn Bryant
Harry Bryant
W. Cadorette
George Cole
Gene Cote
Roland Cote
John Davis
Leonard Davis
Earl Durant
Charles Durrel
Frank Eastman Master Carpenter
Harold Emmons
Summer Fenderson
Jim Feeny
Moses Fletcher
E. P. Gagne
Ralph Girard
Joseph Green
H. P. Hanson
Nate Harford
Joe Howard
John Thim
Ralph Tounge
Jesse Townsend Master Mechanic
Robert Hussey
Karl Jameson
Charles Jameson
Pat Kearney
Philip Lepage
Joe Levigne
Foster Leavitt Sr
Eugene Lord Treasurer
Ralph H. Meserve Motorman Saco
Ed Norman
Dan Pepin
George Perkins Motorman
Charles Rhodes Conductor
Manny Richards
Charlie Ridlon Motorman
Joe Riley
Albert Rock
W. Sherwood
Frank Spofford
Fred Stackpole
Frank Whitehead
Edward Beaudoin
J. H. Johnson
Albert Milliken
Shorty Grenier Motorman 1935

Promotionl Material

Below are examples of promotional material used by the line.

Car Adverts

Birney cars had advertising signs on both ends of the car. Open cars could also carry adverts. Company slogans were sometimes used in the place of adverts. These slogans included:[1]

  • The Street Car is the Safest Vehicle on the Street
  • Save Money, Ride Street Cars
  • 69 Cars Leave Biddeford Every Day for Old Orchard
  • Fireworks Every Wednesday Night-Extra Street Cars
  • Be Cool- Ride in the Open.

Song

Alex T. Greenwood, a Biddeford music teacher, dedicated a song to the trolley line called Cares Are Soon Forgot.[1]

Local folks all point with pride
To our five cent trolley ride,
The cheapest form of transportation.
Drop a nickel in the slot,
All your cares are soon forgot,
While riding to your destination.

Accidents

No fatal accidents were ever recorded on the line, but minor mishaps did occasionally occur.[1]

On 9/13/1899, there was a rear end collision at the bottom of Alfred Street. One passenger was treated for shock.

On 5/30/1900, There was a head-on collision at the bottom of Dean Hill in Biddeford, with three passengers slightly injured.

A Greyhound bus struck an open car on Elm Street on a day on July of 1925. Crew members Charles Ridlon and Charles Rhodes were injured. The trolley, car No. 35, was destroyed.

On 2/24/1931 at 5:20 in the afternoon, cars No. 42 and No. 28 had a head on collision at Jameson's Hill. The front end of each car had to be rebuilt.

In 1933, a firetruck struck car No. 54 on Main Street in Biddeford. A potion of the driver's side was ripped from the trolley.

A Griggs-Turner trailer truck collided with car No.38 in December of 1935, on Elm Street. George Perkins was driving the Birney car at the time.

In 1937, car No. 620 left the tracks on Elm Street in Biddeford.

Again at Dean Hill in Biddeford, a runaway plow lost control and nearly struck a passenger car. It was stopped in the nick of time by Charles Leavitt.

York Hill in Saco was the site of multiple derailments. Once, a car narrow missed falling into the Saco river after coming off the tracks.

More derailments occurred on Elm Street and Alfred Street in Biddeford. There was a derailment where the crossing of the Boston and Maine railroad meet Main Street in Saco. Another derailment occurred near the Saco Country Club on Old Orchard Road.

A car was derailed on Jameson's Hill one evening and was not found until some time later as it had made its way into the woods on the left side of the track.

Equipment

This section shows all equipment used by the line.

Passenger Cars

The following table shows each passenger car used in the system.[1]

Number Style Type Builder Year Trucks Motors Control Notes
1 Open 8 Bench Jones 1888 Original horsecar. Later used as trailers.
2 Closed 16' Box Jones 1888 Bemis 1-WP30 J Original horsecar. Motorized 1892. Withdrawn 1900.
3 Open 8 Bench Jones 1888 Original horsecar. Later used as trailers.
4 Closed 16' Box Jones 1888 Bemis 1-WP30 J Original horsecar. Motorized 1892. Withdrawn 1900.
5 Open 8 Bench Jones 1888 Original horsecar. Later used as trailers.
6 Closed 16' Box Jones 1888 Bemis 1-WP30 J Original horsecar. Motorized 1892. Withdrawn 1900.
7 Open 8 Bench Jones 1888 Original horsecar. Later used as trailers.
8 Closed 16' Box Jones 1888 Bemis 1-WP30 J Original horsecar. Motorized 1892. Withdrawn 1900.
9 Open 8 Bench Jones 1888 Original horsecar. Later used as trailers.
10 Closed 18' Box Brill 1900 Brill 21E 2-GE1000 K-10 Converted to one-man in 1921.
11 Open 8 Bench Jones 1888 Original horsecar. Later used as trailers. Equipped with motor in 1892.
12 Closed 18' Box Brill 1900 Brill 21E 2-GE1000 K-10
13 Open 8 Bench Jones 1888 Original horsecar. Later used as trailers. Equipped with motor in 1892.
14 Closed 18' Box Brill 1900 Brill 21E 2-GE1000 K-10 Converted to one-man in 1921.
15 Open 8 Bench Jones 1888 Original horsecar. Later used as trailers. Equipped with motor in 1892.
16 Closed 18' Box Brill 1900 Brill 21E 2-GE1000 K-10 Converted to line car.
17 Open 10 Bench Jones 1892 Bemis 1-WP30 J
18 Closed 18' Box Brill Brill 21E Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1902. Converted to line car.
19 Open 10 Bench Jones 1892 Bemis 1-WP30 J
20 Closed 20' Box Brill 1902 Brill 21E
21 Open 10 Bench Jones 1892 Bemis 1-WP30 J
22 Closed 20' Box Brill 1902 Brill 21E
23 Open 10 Bench Jones 1892 Bemis 1-WP30 J Motors later removed. Used as trailer.
24 Closed 20' Box Brill 1902 Brill 21E Converted to line car.
25 Open 10 Bench Jones 1893 Bemis 1-WP30 J Motors later removed. Used as trailer.
26 Closed 20' Box Brill 1902 Brill 21E
27 Open 10 Bench Jones 1893 Bemis 1-WP30 J Motors later removed. Used as trailer.
28 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Original Birney Safety cars. In service until 1936-1937.
29 Open 12 Bench Brill 1900 Brill 22E 2-GE200 K-10 K-36 later replaced K-10. GE67 replaced GE200.
30 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Original Birney Safety cars. In service until 1936-1937.
31 Open 12 Bench Brill 1900 Brill 22E 2-GE200 K-10 K-36 later replaced K-10. Later owned by Seashore Electric Railway.
32 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Original Birney Safety cars. In service until 1936-1937.
33 Open 12 Bench Brill 1900 Brill 22E 2-GE200 K-10 K-36 later replaced K-10. GE67 replaced GE200.
34 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Original Birney Safety cars. In service until 1936-1937.
35 Open 12 Bench Brill 1900 Brill 22E 2-GE200 K-10 K-36 later replaced K-10. GE67 replaced GE200.
36 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Original Birney Safety cars. In service until 1936-1937.
37 Open 8 Bench Brill Brill 21E Former horsecars from Portland Railroad. Purchased in 1902.
38 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Original Birney Safety cars. In service until 1936-1937.
39 Open 8 Bench Brill Brill 21E Former horsecars from Portland Railroad. Purchased in 1902.
40 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Original Birney Safety cars. In service until 1936-1937.
41 Open 8 Bench Brill Brill 21E Former horsecars from Portland Railroad. Purchased in 1902.
42 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Original Birney Safety cars. In service until 1936-1937.
43 Open 12 Bench Brill 1902 Brill 22E
44 Closed Birney Wason 1922 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Former Exeter Hampton and Amesbury Street Railway car No. 4. Purchased in 1927.
45 Open 12 Bench Brill 1902 Brill 22E
46 Closed Birney Wason 1921 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Former Mass. Northeastern Street Railway No. 0168. Scrapped 1937-1939.
47 Open 12 Bench Brill 1902 Brill 22E
48 Closed Birney Wason 1921 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Former Mass. Northeastern Street Railway No. 0170. Scrapped 1937-1939.
49 Open 12 Bench Brill 1902 Brill 22E
50 Closed Birney Wason 1921 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Former Mass. Northeastern Street Railway No. 0164. Scrapped 1937-1939.
51 Open 12 Bench Brill 1899 Brill 22E Former horsecar No. 153 from Portland Railroad. Purchased in 1923.
52 Closed Birney Wason 1921 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Former Mass. Northeastern Street Railway No. 0160. Scrapped 1937-1939.
53 Open 12 Bench Brill 1899 Brill 22E Former horsecar No. 154 from Portland Railroad. Purchased in 1923.
54 Closed Birney Wason 1921 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Former Mass. Northeastern Street Railway No. 0162. Scrapped 1937-1939.
56 Closed Birney Wason 1921 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Former Mass. Northeastern Street Railway No. 0166. Scrapped 1937-1939.
58 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Former Rockland Thomaston and Camden Street Railway No. 32. Purchased in 1931.
60 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE264 K-63 Former Rockland Thomaston and Camden Street Railway No. 34. Purchased in 1931.
61 Open 12 Bench Brill Brill 22E Former car from Portland Railroad. Purchased in 1925.
63 Open 12 Bench Brill Brill 22E Former car from Portland Railroad. Purchased in 1925.
65 Open 12 Bench Brill Brill 22E Former car from Portland Railroad. Purchased in 1925.
246 Open 12 Bench Brill 1911 Brill 39E Former car from Portland Railroad. Purchased in 1927. Not renumbered due to recent paint job.
247 Open 12 Bench Brill 1911 Brill 39E Former car from Portland Railroad. Purchased in 1927. Not renumbered due to recent paint job.
602 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
603 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
604 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
605 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
606 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
607 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
608 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
609 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
610 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
611 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
612 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
613 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered.
614 Closed Birney Wason 1919 Brill 78M 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1937. Not renumbered. Never used.
615 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1936. Not renumbered. Body at Seashore Electric Railroad.
616 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1936. Not renumbered.
617 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1936. Not renumbered.
618 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1936. Not renumbered.
619 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1936. Not renumbered.
620 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1936. Not renumbered.
621 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1936. Not renumbered.
622 Closed Birney Wason 1920 Brill 79E 2-GE258C K-63 Purchased from Portland Railroad in 1936. Not renumbered.

Service Cars

The following table shows service cars.[1]

Number Type Builder Year Trucks
1 ST Nose Plow Biddeford and Saco Railroad 1892
2 ST Shear Plow Wason 1902
3 ST Nose Plow Traunton 1914
8 18' Line Car Portland 1911
16 18' Line Car Brill 1900 Brill 21E
18 18' Line Car Brill 21E
24 20' Sand Car Brill 1902 Brill 21E

Service Equipment

Additional service equipment included 3 flat cars, a horse-drawn snow plow, a wire car and a utility truck.[1]

Photos

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.21 1.22 Cummings, Osmond Richard, "The Biddeford and Saco Railroad" (1956). Books and Publications. 31. https://digicom.bpl.lib.me.us/books_pubs/31
  2. Electric Railway Journal. September 16, 1916.
  3. Street Railway Journal. December 1892.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Dyer Library Biddeford and Saco Railroad Exhibit, 8/17/2019. 371 Main Street, Saco, Maine, 04072. 207-283-3861. http://www.dyerlibrarysacomuseum.org/